a small chimney on the roof

How to Take Care of Your Chimney

While it is true that fireplaces are not conventional in many tropical countries, chimneys are still widely used in many four-season countries. Apart from its traditional function as the sole source of heat for the house, its commercial use nowadays has limited the use of chimneys to be no more than just a means of home decoration. The phenomenon is also the reason why there are only a few of those residents who decide to build a fireplace in their house. Of course, with it being a classic thing, chimneys turn instantly into not everyone’s choice.

a house with a chimney

However, things are different for those classic style enthusiasts. Many of them are willing to dig deep into their vault to build a fireplace to add the vintage vibe to the building, no matter how much it costs. Then, if you are one of those fans of Victorian houses, one thing that you must know is that it is vital to take good care of your chimneys and fireplaces. Since it is a nice place to hang out with your loved ones, you obviously do not want it to look like a haunted castle, do you?

Regular Cleaning

someone chilling in front of a fireplaceJust like any other maintenance project, regular cleaning can be an excellent start. When it comes to fireplaces, regularly removing the ashes is indeed the right thing to do. Especially during winters when the constant use of fireplaces and chimneys becomes inevitable, it is vital to make sure that the ashes do not build up more than two inches. For that reason, cleaning the area twice or three times a week is needed to prevent the fire stains.

A flat-surfaced fire shovel made of plastic or metal is what you need for the cleaning project. A chimney sweep bar, then, is one of the most useful tools that you can use to clean the area. The flat and somewhat sharp cutting edge below the socket is effective in reaching through the inner wall of the fireplace, thoroughly scratching the ashes out of the hole.

Stain Removal

A mixture of soap and water is a powerful potion to remove soot and fire stains. You can apply the liquid to the stained surfaces, leave it for thirty minutes, and scrub the area with a wire brush. However, when the stains get too stubborn to remove, a chemical fluid called muriatic acid is what you need. Despite the fluid’s toxic and harsh nature, it has proved to be efficacious to remove even the most stubborn stains.…